Chemtrails Exposed: Truly A New Manhattan Project

Nov 2, 2017 by

-1541915524879679616yiv0310305373yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1509406223281_273871″>This article presents yet more evidence linking the original and the new.  These early connections emanate not only from the original Manhattan Project, but also from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Radiation Laboratory (MIT Rad Lab/Rad Lab).  Many Manhattan Project scientists also worked at this war-time Radiation Laboratory.  The information presented here also provides more evidence for the assertion that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has been this global weather modification project’s main research and development vehicle.

This article is the product of a lengthy investigation into WWII-era Big Science, the original Manhattan Project, the MIT Rad Lab, and much more.  In this article, we will see how the military/industrial/academic complex created during WWII enabled the development of technologies which have gone on to become integral parts of a global weather modification project the author calls the New Manhattan Project.  This essay serves to solidify the assertion that the chemtrails so often seen in today’s skies are part of an ultra-massive and super-secret global weather modification project which is truly a new Manhattan Project.

Pre-Rad Lab

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) probably first conceived of the plans to manipulate the weather with electromagnetic energy which eventually grew into what the author calls today’s New Manhattan Project (NMP).  Although the author has been unable to verify direct documentary evidence showing his hand, other circumstantial evidence strongly suggests it.

Tesla did a great deal of theorizing about weather control and he specifically theorized about using directed energy to manipulate the atmosphere.  Bernard Eastlund (1938-2007), the inventor of today’s most significant, powerful, and versatile electromagnetic energy generator (the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Project or HAARP), attributed its fundamental technologies to Tesla.  There are many of these so-called ‘ionospheric heaters’ all around the world today being used to manipulate the weather as part of the NMP.  Also, when Tesla died, huge quantities of his effects (most notably his scientific papers and instruments) were confiscated by the United States government.  Among these confiscated papers may have been the initial New Manhattan Project plans.  The timing is right.  As noted above, Tesla died in 1943, then just three years later, Bernard Vonnegut (who later went on to conduct early NMP field experiments) and two other General Electric (GE) scientists were simultaneously kicking-off the scientific era of weather control and the New Manhattan Project.  The three years plus between Tesla’s death and GE’s famous exploits would be plenty of time to review Tesla’s material and make plans for the future.  The MIT Rad Lab was already well at work on related technologies.


Most curiously though, the scientific expert charged with reviewing Nikola Tesla’s posthumously confiscated papers was a Radiation Lab Steering Committee member and Assistant Director by the name of John G. Trump (1907-1985).  For our military, John G. Trump translated the Tesla papers from Scientist to English.  Our military, in turn, decided which of Tesla’s ideas were of military value and thus worthy of further exploration.  John G. Trump went on to serve as the head of the British Branch of the MIT Radiation Laboratory.  If you are wondering… yes, John G. Trump was the uncle of the new United States President Donald J. Trump.  In fact, The Donald’s middle name of ‘John’ was given to him in honor of his uncle.

John G. Trump

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Radiation Laboratory


A typical day at the Rad Lab
 
MIT Rad Lab scientists developed early examples of technologies which have since gone on to become large parts of today’s NMP.  Specifically, the Rad Lab made important early advancements in the areas of ionospheric heaters and air traffic control.  These technologies involve the creative use of electromagnetic energy.  The creative use of electromagnetic energy applied to the WWII effort was what the Rad Lab was all about.
The MIT Rad Lab operated between 1940 and 1945 and it was big.  Before the end of the war, the Rad Lab was employing nearly 4,000 people.  The MIT Rad Lab was underwritten by a half-million dollars of John D. Rockefeller Jr. money.  By its last year, the Rad Lab reached a budget of about $125,000 per day, or close to $4 million per month.  In 1945 the MIT Rad Lab had sixty-nine different academic institutions represented on its staff.  It produced 150 radar systems.  By the end of the war, the Rad Lab had delivered to the armed services 3 billion dollars worth of radar equipment.  That’s $40 billion in today’s dollars; about $10 billion more than the cost of the original Manhattan Project.
Many scientists who worked on the original Manhattan Project also worked out of the Rad Lab.  Famous Manhattan Project scientists Kenneth Bainbridge (1904-1996), Jerrold Zacharias (1905-1986), and Robert Bacher (1905-2004) were all members of the Rad Lab Steering Committee.
The MIT Rad Lab grew out of something called the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) Microwave Committee.  This Microwave Committee was part of an NDRC division headed by the famous scientist and president of MIT Karl Taylor Compton (1887-1954).  Karl Compton also served on the Interim Committee which advised president Truman as to the use of the newly created atomic bomb.  His brother was Manhattan Project scientist Arthur Compton (1892-1962).  We will have more about the NDRC shortly.
At the behest of Karl Compton, the NDRC Microwave Committee was run by a man by the name of Alfred Lee Loomis (1887-1975).  Alfred Loomis was also later a Rad Lab co-founder.  The official NDRC historian during the second world war, James Phinney Baxter wrote an excellent book titled Scientists Against Time which efficiently describes the Microwave Committee’s origins.  Baxter writes:  https://www.amazon.com/Scientists-against-James-Phinney-Baxter/dp/B0006AQWW4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1509471254&sr=8-1&keywords=Scientists+against+time
When the National Defense Research Committee was established, the first suggestions from the armed services of fields for NDRC investigation included basic research at ultra-high frequencies and studies of pulse transmission.  The Air Corps was looking for solutions to the problem of fog and haze and was interested in the possibility of bombing through the overcast.  [Karl] Compton, Chief of Division D, promptly established a section to study the applications of microwaves (radio waves 10 centimeters or less in length) to detection devices.  This Section D-1, which later became Division 14 of NDRC, was headed by Alfred L. Loomis, a New York lawyer and a pioneer in the field of microwaves.  It included scientists and engineers drawn from the American universities and industrial concerns which had done the most to develop microwave techniques.  The Microwave Committee, as it was commonly called, continued with remarkably few changes in personnel throughout the war.
The MIT Rad Lab then evolved from the NDRC Microwave Committee.  In mid-1940 a group of British scientists and officials, led by a man named Henry Tizard, arranged for their revolutionary short-wave radar prototype to be delivered to America.  This was known as ‘The Tizard Mission.’  In exchange for this technology, the U.S. promised development and production.  The British needed radar as part of their war effort against Germany, so did the U.S..  In late 1940, the Microwave Committee unanimously voted to establish development and production facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Research began at what was soon called the Radiation Laboratory on November 10, 1940, under an NDRC contract with M.I.T..  The famous namesake of Lawrence Livermore National Labs and Manhattan Project physicist, Ernest O. Lawrence (1901-1958) recruited physicists in the early days, including the Director of the Laboratory, Dr. Lee DuBridge (1901-1994).  Dr. E. G. ‘Taffy’ Bowen (1911-1991) of the Tizard Mission joined the staff as British Liaison Officer.
The Rad Lab developed and produced radar and radar-like systems and contracted for radar set (transmitter and receiver) production with five industrial concerns: Raytheon, General Electric, Radio Corporation of America (RCA), Westinghouse, and Philco & Sperry.  Raytheon today probably manages the electromagnetic portions of the New Manhattan Project while General Electric has a plethora of connections to the NMP.  MIT has a long and rich tradition of co-operating with industry.
The MIT Rad Lab is most well known for developing the airplane-mounted radar which allowed Allied fighters to see submerged German submarines called U-boats.  Before the advent of this plane-mounted radar, the German U-boats were sinking Allied ships with relative impunity.  Radar produced at the Rad Lab allowed our boys to blow their U-boats to smithereens, regain maritime supremacy, and ensure the safe passage of Allied shipping.  The Rad Lab developed and produced scads of other technologies that dramatically helped our soldiers win, including some extremely effective submarine radar for the Pacific theatre.  As it has been written and said many times: the atomic bomb only ended the war, radar won it.
As the war ended, the Rad Lab was closed down and people who had been working there found employment elsewhere in the vast, newly created military/industrial/academic complex.  Depopulated, the MIT Rad Lab was officially terminated on the last day of 1945, only to be bureaucratically reborn the next day (the first day of 1946) as something called the Basic Research Division.  Six months later, the Basic Research Division re-joined MIT as a subdivision of the newly established Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE).
It is interesting to note that on the campus of MIT, both the Rad Lab and the later Research Laboratory of Electronics shared building space with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) because the ONR has many connections to the New Manhattan Project.

LORAN/SS Loran

Today, electromagnetic energy generated from ground-based antennas called ‘ionospheric heaters’ is used to manipulate the atmosphere and therefore modify the weather.  The use of electromagnetic energy is what distinguishes the New Manhattan Project from the conventional cloud-seeding industry.  The biggest early developments of technologies which have since resulted in today’s ionospheric heaters took place at the MIT Rad Lab.  Ionospheric heaters have evolved from something developed at the Rad Lab called the Long Range Navigation (LORAN) system.  For more about ionospheric heaters and their role in the NMP, see the author’s previous article “Smoking Gun: The HAARP and Chemtrails Connection.”
During the Rad Lab years was when Big Science got serious about bouncing radio waves off of the ionosphere.  Before LORAN, the most significant contributions in this area were made by Nikola Tesla and Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), and then later by scientists Gregory Breit (1899-1981) and Merle Tuve (1901-1982).  As we have seen, Nikola Tesla was probably the father of the New Manhattan Project.  Merle Tuve was the director of the terrestrial magnetism division of the Carnegie Institution.  The Carnegie Institution has many NMP connections. The LORAN concept was first proposed by the aforementioned Alfred Lee Loomis.  Before this article is over, we will have much more about the enigmatic Mr. Loomis.
LORAN developments were originally produced under something called the Loran Group and later under the MIT Radiation Laboratory Navigation Group.  The Loran Group started as a subcommittee of the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) Microwave Committee not part of the MIT Rad Lab.  In the early 1940s, the Loran Group was founded and administrated by a man named Melville Eastham (1885-1964).  Famous scientists like: Donald G. Fink (1911-1996), J. Curry Street (1906-1989), and Julius Adams Stratton (1901-1994) were members of the Loran Group and made significant contributions.  By early summer of 1941, the LORAN project became the Rad Lab’s when the MIT Radiation Laboratory Navigation Group took over the LORAN project.  Fink and Street went on to run the project after Mr. Eastham’s retirement.
The LORAN system involved sending electromagnetic signals from multiple ground-based transmitters to airborne and waterborne receiving sets in order to determine the position and bearing of the ship; a type of triangulation.  LORAN allowed the ship’s navigator to determine his position and bearing and thus proceed accordingly.
Loran systems did not always bounce radio waves off the ionosphere.  They did so only at night.  When the electromagnetic signals were simply sent roughly perpendicular along the surface of the Earth, it was called ‘ground-wave’ Loran.  This is what was done during daytime hours.  At night, LORAN systems and their operators bounced the transmissions off the ionosphere using something called ‘Sky-wave Synchronized LORAN’ or ‘SS Loran’ for short.  SS Loran had much longer ranges than the ground-waves.  Ground-wave transmissions were used during the day and SS Loran at night because the ionosphere is adequately reflective at night and not so during the day.  Ham radio operators have operated upon this principle for many decades.  In the early summer of 1941, successful SS Loran field experiments were conducted between Montauk, New York and as far west as Springfield, Missouri; a distance of about 1,200 miles.
Ground-wave Loran and SS Loran
 
By mid-1942, LORAN field experiments were going very well and hence the project was enjoying lots of funding, access, and other help.  Earlier in the year, the LORAN project had acquired a Naval Liaison Officer by the name of Captain L.M. Harding.  By this time, the scientists of the Radiation Laboratory Navigation Group were successfully sending SS Loran signals from Fenwick Island, Delaware to the Azores Islands; a distance of over 4,000 miles.  The British and Canadian governments and militaries were co-operating extensively.
Also in mid-1942, the development of the airborne SS Loran receivers, which had previously been conducted by General Electric, was turned over to the Aircraft Radio Laboratory of the Signal Corps at Wright Field.  Both General Electric and Wright Field (now Wright-Patterson Air Force Base) have extensive ties to the New Manhattan Project.  Although the first LORAN receiver sets were produced by the Rad Lab itself, the receiver sets were ultimately mass produced by the Radio Corporation of America (RCA).
In 1943 LORAN went fully operational in the North Atlantic.  On Jan. 1, 1943 the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) took over the aforementioned Fenwick and Montauk stations.  In June of that year, transmitting stations in: Labrador, Newfoundland, and Greenland were also turned over to the USCG.  In order to provide constant military navigation services, the USCG (in co-operation with the Navy and the Rad Lab) then began operating these stations 24 hours a day.  By this time, LORAN was commonly able to transmit to a ship up to 700 miles away during daylight hours and up to 1,400 miles away at night.  By 1945, the Canadians and the British along with the Americans (Allied Powers) were operating a slew of transmitting stations which provided LORAN coverage from the North Atlantic down to the Caribbean.  Also by the end of WWII, LORAN systems were operational all over the northern and western Pacific Ocean and the Far East with coverage from Alaska, to Japan, to the China-Burma-India theater, and on down into the East Indies.  By the end of the war LORAN covered three tenths of the Earth’s surface.
The development of SS Loran led to the later development of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar.  Today’s ionospheric heaters are the direct descendants of OTH radar and therefore ionospheric heaters are the direct descendants of SS Loran.  Amazingly enough, OTH radar transmitters bounce a signal off the ionosphere, then that signal hits a target which sends an echo back off the ionosphere again and back to the transmitter.  In this way, we are able to remotely sense objects thousands of miles away.  OTH radar technologies were first developed in the 1950s.  We left Kansas a long time ago.

Air traffic control

“I see a manless Air Force . . . [that] is going to be built around scientists – around mechanically minded fellows.” – Vannevar Bush
 
Today’s New Manhattan Project air traffic control systems are most probably the descendants of two different Rad Lab activities.  One of these was a project called Ground-Controlled Approach (GCA) and the other was research and development in the area of highly automated missile batteries.
Ground-Controlled Approach systems allowed pilots to safely land their plane in zero visibility conditions and suggested radar-enhanced remote control.  These truck-mounted systems used radar to determine an airship’s position and bearing.  Once position and bearing had been determined, a GCA operator would give specific voice commands to the pilot over the two-way radio and talk the pilot down this way.  It worked very well and was put into military use by the end of the war to save many lives.  Manhattan Project scientist, Nobel Prize winner, and Rad Lab Steering Committee member Luis Alvarez (1911-1988) led the GCA group.  Alfred Loomis was also instrumental in its development.

Luis W. Alvarez
The GCA system suggested a new generation of remotely controlled aircraft systems.  In the early 1940s, remotely controlled aircraft were not incredibly new.  As early as 1918 remote controlled bombers were being flown.  Operators relied upon being able to see the aircraft with their own two eyes.  The GCA system developed at the Rad Lab allowed operators of remotely controlled planes to ‘see’ their plane much more accurately and from further away.  As far as the controlling of the plane goes, the next logical step for the GCA was to substitute electronic signals for voice commands.  Electronic signals, as was done with earlier remotely controlled aircraft, could give GCA operators direct control of the target aircraft’s navigational controls.  This type of radar-enhanced aircraft remote control was a major technological advancement in the field.
Another area of study at the MIT Rad Lab that most probably contributed to the air traffic control systems of today’s NMP is that of automated missile batteries.  During the Rad Lab years, our military was fantasizing about sweeping guided bombs across the enemy like they had been sprayed out of a fire hose.  At that time, such remote launch and guidance of missiles had much room for improvement, though.  Although our military’s initial uptake of these types of systems was slow, our August, 1943 discovery of the Germans using radio-controlled missiles prompted our American military to get a move on.  After 1943, a plethora of related programs were initiated.  Technologies developed at the Rad Lab contributed greatly to this body of work.
These early developments of automated missile batteries led to something called the Sage system.  The Sage system was developed at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory.  The MIT Lincoln Laboratory was founded by key figures in the MIT Rad Lab and the subsequent Research Laboratory of Electronics.  Later, in 1958 about 500 Lincoln Laboratory Employees left and formed the Mitre Corporation.  The Mitre Corporation is probably the day-to-day manager of today’s NMP.  For more about the Mitre Corporation, please see the author’s previous article “MITRE: Architects of the New Manhattan Chemtrail Project?”
The aforementioned scientist mostly responsible for the GCA system, Luis Alvarez went on to become a trustee of the Mitre Corporation.  He was also a senior advisor to the secretive Jason Group which is implicated in the New Manhattan Project as well. 

Vannevar Bush: architect of the military/industrial/academic complex and founder of the New Manhattan Project


Vannevar Bush
The aforementioned Vannevar Bush (1890-1974) was the man most responsible for the formation of today’s military/industrial/academic complex.  Bob Dylan’s song “Masters of War” is about him.  We all know about Eisenhower’s famous coining of the term ‘military/industrial complex.’  The former President is referring to the combined power of giant organizations enabled by the bureaucratic framework established by Vannevar Bush and his cronies.  Bush was the head of the WWII-era National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) as well as the head of the concurrent Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD).  While overseeing massive growth for all parties involved, Bush brought our military, corporations, and universities together to work on enormous projects such as the original Manhattan Project and the MIT Rad Lab.  Without congressional approval, Bush and his cronies created the first American ‘black’ military budgets.  Surprisingly, no, he was not related to the Bush political crime family.
In 1913 Vannevar Bush went to work for General Electric as a ‘test man.’  Bush got his PhD from MIT in 1916.  He joined the MIT faculty in 1919.  Working with J.P. Morgan and others, Bush co-founded Raytheon in 1924.  By 1926, Bush was a Raytheon consultant and he owned 3.6 percent of the company’s outstanding stock.  In the early 1930s, Bush’s stature at MIT was greatly enhanced with the arrival of MIT President Karl Compton.  Bush was then named Dean of the School of Engineering and a member of the MIT Corporation; the university’s board of directors.  General Electric, Raytheon, and MIT all have extensive ties to the New Manhattan Project.  After the war, Bush was to become Chairman of the MIT Corporation.
At the start of 1939, Bush became president of the powerful Carnegie Institution in Washington D.C.; another organization inextricably associated with the NMP.  It was around this time that Bush began thinking that consolidating powers of the government, the military, and the private sector might match the efficiencies of the Nazi war machine then terrorizing Europe.  With key support from such men as: Secretary of War Henry ‘Skull & Bones’ Stimson (1867-1950), the President of the National Academy of Sciences Frank Jewett (1879-1949), Manhattan Project chemist James B. Conant (1893-1978), Karl Compton, and Alfred Loomis, Bush went about doing just that. 
By May of 1940, Bush had enlisted the help of a man named John Victory to draft legislative language calling for the creation of what he called the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC).  The NDRC was to bring together America’s militaries, corporations, and universities in an effort to more efficiently produce new weaponry.  Bush called upon Frederic Delano (the President’s uncle) to arrange an appointment with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  In early June, Delano’s request landed Bush a meeting with the president’s closest aide Harry Hopkins.  Hopkins arranged for Bush to see the president.  On June 12, at their meeting, Roosevelt endorsed the NDRC.  With this endorsement, Roosevelt had promised Bush direct access to the White House, virtual immunity from congressional oversight, and his own line of funds.  Without an act of congress, with the stroke of a pen, the military/industrial/academic complex was born.
At a June 14 press conference, Roosevelt announced Bush’s appointment as the head of the newly created NDRC.  Compton, Jewett, and Conant quickly became his principal aides.  Many other prominent experts (many of whom went on to be Manhattan Project and Rad Lab scientists) soon flocked to the organization.  The NDRC leadership was stacked with MIT graduates.

Original NDRC members seated from left to right: Brigadier General George V. Strong, James B. Conant, Vannevar Bush, Richard C. Tolman, and Frank B. Jewett.  Standing left to right: Karl T. Compton, Irvin Stewart, and Rear Admiral Harold G. Bowen, Sr.
The vast majority of Bush’s funding decisions benefited his friends and colleagues.  Bush himself later admitted he had pulled off, “an end run, a grab by which a small company of scientists and engineers, outside established channels, got hold of the authority and money for the program of developing new weapons.”  Even though the Carnegie Institution figured to be among the top recipients of NDRC contracts, Bush not only retained his presidency there, but the Carnegie Institution’s headquarters became those of the NDRC.  The Carnegie Institution ended up getting about $3 million in NDRC contracts.  Scads of NDRC grants would also flow to his former employer MIT.  In fact, MIT was the top academic recipient of NDRC contract dollars, raking in about $117 million.  During the course of the war, Raytheon, whose stock Bush still owned, enjoyed a 60-fold growth in sales.  The connections between the Carnegie Institution, MIT, Raytheon, and the NMP are legion.  Although Bush fretted about conflicts of interest and later tried to officially legalize his activities, Roosevelt didn’t initially see any of this as a problem.
By mid-1941, out of legal and funding concerns, President Roosevelt approved the creation of the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) to run the NDRC.  The NDRC became the chief operating unit of the OSRD.  Under the previous arrangement, the NDRC was funded by the executive branch.  Under the OSRD, the NDRC became funded by Congress.  Bush remained in charge as he assumed the position of Director of the OSRD and Conant became NDRC Chairman.  By 1944, Bush’s OSRD was spending $3 million a week on 6,000 researchers at more than 300 industrial and university labs.
It is interesting to note that the NDRC did extensive work for the Off

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