San Francisco’s Number One Outhouse

Mar 27, 2015 by

LIFE EDITED

No crap, this is good design
Creativity often flourishes inside constraints. In the case of San Francisco Architect Christi Azevedo, the constraints were an old 8’ x 11’ boiler room built in 1916. Working with those constraints–not to mention a welding gun–she transformed the small space into a full-function dwelling.

Creativity often flourishes inside constraints. In the case of San Francisco Architect Christi Azevedo, the constraints were an old 8’ x 11’ boiler room built in 1916. Working with those constraints–not to mention a welding gun–she transformed the small space into a full-function dwelling.

Azevedo is both an architect and metalworker and spent a year and a half designing and outfitting the space’s interior. She fabricated virtually every interior detail, save the structure’s brick walls and some IKEA kitchen cabinetry. The primary materials are steel and walnut, lending an aesthetic that is both modern and sleek, yet rough hewn enough to match the weathered brick walls.

The space’s roof was raised five feet to permit three separate tiers, an effect, Azevedo told Dwell, meant to draw attention upward to create a sense of interior spaciousness.

Like many tricked out small spaces, this one is a guest house in a larger residence, but we could definitely see a design like this working as a full-time residence or installed in a larger building.

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